Speaker Date Topic
Dr. Marissa Leslie, Adventist HealthCare May 31, 2018
Mental Illness in America
Mental Illness in America

Marissa Cummings Leslie, MD has dual board certification in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and General Psychiatry.  She is currently the Medical Director of both Inpatient and Outpatient Services for Adventist HealthCare Behavioral Health & Wellness Services in Rockville, Maryland. She completed her Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and University of Pennsylvania program in 2007. She completed her General Psychiatry residency at Loma Linda University in Southern California in 2005. She has previous research collaborative experience in anti-violence and anti-bullying studies at CHOP. She has also holds a certificate from the Harvard Program in Refugee Trauma. Her main academic interest is PTSD in immigrants and refugees. 

Meeting at Normandie Farm Restaurant Jun 07, 2018
Kim Williams, D.C. Historic Preservation Office Jun 14, 2018
Lost Farms and Estates of Washington, D.C.
Lost Farms and Estates of Washington, D.C.

Kim Prothro Williams is an architectural historian with the D.C. Historic Preservation Office. For more than twenty-five years, she has been researching and writing about historic buildings and communities in D.C., Virginia and Maryland, with her primary focus being to evaluate buildings for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Kim is a published author of books, articles and heritage trail brochures dealing with the built environment. Two of her books, “Chevy Chase: A Home Suburb for the Nation’s Capital” and “Pride of Place: Rural Residences of Fauquier County, Virginia,” address the transformation of the agricultural landscape. Her most recent title is “Lost Farms and Estates of Washington, D.C.,” which explores the rural remnants of the nation’s capital.  https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/farm-team-imagine-grapes-on-the-mall-and-corn-across-the-district/2018/05/01/a02d4962-4d4a-11e8-84a0-458a1aa9ac0a_story.html?utm_term=.933dc58173d5

Katey Boerner, Executive Director Jun 21, 2018
Glen Echo Park
Glen Echo Park

Glen Echo Park is one of the finest cultural resources in the Washington, DC area.

It is home to 13 resident artists and arts organizations, a thriving social dance program, a restored 1921 Dentzel Carousel, two award-winning children's theaters, a weekend drop-in art program for children, numerous art studios and galleries, a nature program, and hundreds of classes in visual and performing arts, including ceramics, painting, photography, glass, music, dance, and more. These activities, as well as free summer concerts, festivals, and special events bring thousands of visitors to the Park each year.

The site was first developed in the 1890s as a Chautauqua retreat and soon became the premier Washington area amusement park, serving the community until 1968. In 1971 the federal government acquired the land in order to preserve the Potomac Palisades and prevent development along the river. The management of the Park was assigned to the National Park Service, which established the core of the current arts program.

In 2002, the National Park Service transferred management of the Park to Montgomery County, which in turn created the Glen Echo Park Partnership for Arts and Culture, a new nonprofit, to oversee the Park’s arts programs and historic facilities.

From 2003 to 2010, extensive renovations of the Park's facilities took place under the direction of Montgomery County and the National Park Service with input from the Partnership and resident organizations. These renovations were funded with major federal, state, and county resources as well as private donations. Renovations included: the Spanish Ballroom, the Dentzel Carousel, the Puppet Co. Playhouse, the Arcade building, the Yellow Barn, Adventure Theatre, the Candy Corner, the Chautauqua Tower, the Ballroom Annex, and the Caretaker's Cottage.

Social at Bretton Woods Recreation Center Jun 28, 2018